Category Archives: Fashion

The Lackluster Golden Globes Red Carpet & What They Should Have Worn

Save for Kate Hudson in Versace and J.Lo in Zahair Murad, the ensembles parading down the Golden Globe’s red carpet tonight turned out to be one giant disappointment (Emma Stone wore a jumpsuit and Lorde wore trousers…and media sources are commending them…really!?). Celebrities should look down right jaw-dropping for these kinds of high profile events, especially for the Golden Globes which is considered one of the biggest red carpet fashion events of the year. We don’t know whether to blame the celebs or their stylists, but we sure know it’s not because of a lack of innovative design, the couture collections for this year are absolutely stunning. Here’s are some looks we wish we saw adorning out favorite stars at this year’s awards:

Stephane Rolland 

SRred2 SRred1

SRmaroon1SRmaroon2

SRBWSRBW2

SRblack1SRblack2

Zahair Murad

ZM1

Ralph & Russo

R&R2 R&R1 R&R3

Azzaro

Azzaro1

Versace

Versace

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Designer Spotlight – Daniela D’Amico

DanielaDAmico_DigitalLookbookAW14 copy

One of I.F.’s prime objectives is to spread the word about amazing, innovative, and creatively unique designers from around the world, and share their individual stories with the fashion community as they start to gain ground in the  industry.

The designers featured by I.F. have passed a series of requirements including (but not limited to) the use of fair labor practices and a knack for unique and awe-inspiring design that we believe set them apart from their peers and that will undoubtedly give them the ability to lay claim to a successful career in fashion design as they begin their journey in building their brand.

This week, I.F. is featuring Daniela D’Amico, a London-based designer whose Autumn/Winter 2014 collection is inspired by the picturesque scenery and architecture of her ancestral home, Lake Como, Italy. I.F. sat down with the up-and-coming designer who divulged all about her career journey and the story behind her brand. She also kindly gave us some exclusive photos of her Autumn/Winter 2014 Collection to share with the I.F. audience!

Daniela’s fashion journey started at a young age. Daniela was always interested in textiles and fashion in school and often spent her free time trying to create new textiles and using her home sewing machine to sew lustrous fabrics like silks and satins, “I loved to make interesting finishes using a princess pleater, this was my favourite tool for coming up with innovative creations,” says the young designer. Daniela went on to study Art Foundation at The London College of Fashion and from there went on to Chelsea College of Art where she received her BA in Textile Design. It was here that the designer discovered specialized design techniques including how to convey traditional techniques in a modern way, as well as how to use digital print and fabric manipulation – a complex technique which has become the designer’s trademark. When she graduated, Daniela went on to work in womenswear as Head of the Design Studio for Selina Blow. This year, Daniela decided it was time to pursue her dream of starting her own brand.

Daniela finds inspiration in her surroundings, “If I am in London it may be a part of architecture, an art show, color, or nature. It could be a different city that I may be in. Wherever I go, I will always carry my note book and jot down anything that I feel inspires me, or inspirational thoughts I have. I am usually inspired by a certain place, artist or movement – it can be a combination of them all. For this season I was also inspired by the work of Peter Doig who captured timeless moments of perfect tranquillity.”

peter doig

Peter Doig’s “Concrete Cabin” 1994, oil on canvas

Daniela’s strong dedication to her craft is more than admirable – it is inspiring. She works tirelessly from sketch to production in order to construct absolutely original, top-of-the-line designs, “All of the images are taken myself. I have manipulated the images and almost played with them like they are a piece of collage, working with each image on top of a sketch of one of my garment designs. I then work out which part of the print would work where and go from there.”

When it comes to materials and production, Daniela uses only the best, “I use a selection of cottons, satins, silks and velvets. All of my fabrics are either sourced from England or Italy. I like to mix textiles, you will see a mixture of soft satins on one piece with a fierce structured collar made in cotton velvet to finish. I use a small factory in London, it has a very nice, friendly and relaxed atmosphere and they are great to work with considering I am always challenging them with my printed textiles and luxurious, expensive fabrics!”

Isola Bella

The Lake Como-inspired A/W ’14 collection is the result of the designers textile design expertise combined with her eye for photography and knack for originality. The collection has an androgynous gestalt, achieved by a harmonious combination of intricate tailoring and romantic prints. Each and every piece is given special attention to proportion and design positioning ensuring an ultra-flattering silhouette.

Cernobbio

Emma Watson, Alexa Chung and Sienna Miller were some of the names the designer mentioned when asked about her dream customer, “a modern, laid back, strong woman who enjoys colour and bringing tailoring to life.”

Daniela has marked plans for the future, planning “to one day take the brand internationally, and show the collection to as many people as I possibly can. One of the most interesting parts in the job is meeting the people who want to wear my clothes and hearing their story, this inspires me to design.”

Though still in the stages of putting her on-line store, www.danieladamico.com,  together, be sure to check out her Facebook for updates on her collection and an inside look to her creative process.

Thank you, Daniela, for sharing your passion with us – we are looking forward to getting our hands on a few pieces from your collection!

Como

 

Tremezzo

 

Montagna

 

DA

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Top Five Summer Dresses 2014

An eclectic mix of elements will be seen meshing together in the outfits of the fashion conscious this summer. Lace overlays, sheer cutouts, pale pastels, a mini ‘90s revival, athletic aesthetics, floral patterns and iridescent fabrics were among the most trending features reported by the top fashion intelligence experts. Five clear dress styles are sure to become summer wardrobe staples, encompassing trending elements in a wide variety of breathable fabrics from romantic flowing silks to sporty jersey knits:

shirtdress1. The Menswear Inspired Shirtdress

The comfortable and versatile shirtdress is by far the number one top trending dress style for summer 2014. In lengths ranging from maxi to mini, the traditional shirtdress will be seen in pastel shirting fabrics like Raspberry Pink Chambray  and all-white cottons like White BroadclothMore formal versions will be made of elegant, slinky fabrics like Chambray Blue Slinky and Dusty Blue Crepe Sweater Knit Floral and geometric prints like the Blue Block Polyester Charmeuse will also be major themes in this particular dress style.

2. The Sexy Pencil SkirtPencilSkirt

Pencil skirts that land just above to knee to calf-length are a big summer must-have. The body-hugging silhouette will be seen with lace overlays from bright red stretch laceto pastels like Pink Peach Stretch LaceDark Blush Pink Laceand Cream Stretch Lace Pencil skirts will also be made of light-weight jersey knits made of polyester/spandex or cotton/spandex blends for an exaggerated form-fitting look with this summer’s trending prints like animal print motifsgrey/black snakeskin jersey knitGrey Snakeskin Jersey KnitGrey Cheetah Jersey KnitGrey/Purple Cheetah Jersey Knitand tribal prints White/Orange Aztec Jersey Knit and Beige Aztec Stripe Jersey KnitPencil skirts with black stretch mesh cutouts are also popular, adding an extra hint of sex appeal to the already sexy silhouette.

SlinkySlipDress

3. The Slinky Slip Dress

A staple of the ‘90s wardrobe, the slip dress is making a revival this summer in iridescent silks and metallic sheens like Violet Purple Shimmer and Pale Yellow Iridescent Silk Organza The slip dress, in various flowing fabrics of silk, blends and slinky synthetics like rayon, will also feature some of summer’s trending elements like floral prints – Black/White Floral ChallisBlack Floral ChallisIvory Floral Silk Chiffonpastels – Blush Pink CrepePeach Silk Crepe de ChineBaby Blue Crinkled Silk ChiffonPink/Blue Silk Crepe de ChineSalmon Pink Satin Charmeuse, and bright pinks – Lipstick Pink Crepe

4. The Sporty Jersey Dress

SportyJerseyDress

A casual, athletic aesthetic is a major summer trend, and in terms of dresses this translates into sleeveless sheath styles in lightweight cotton/lycra jersey knits like Black Jersey Knit especially with thigh-high side slits.

The “athletic luxe” trend also brought the return of the super comfortable sweatshirt dress in thicker, yet soft and breathable, 100% cotton jersey knits like the Charcoal Grey Jersey Knit The sweatshirt dress will be seen in mini skirt lengths with short, three-quarter length, or long sleeves.

FullSkirt

5. The Flirty Full Skirt

In lengths ranging from maxi to mini, full skirts will be seen flouncing around the legs of style mavens this summer in a wide range of shapes. The summer 2014 version of full skirts will be made in structured, A-line shapes with Black Tulle underlays, and also flowing styles with sheer overlays like accordion pleated Black Chiffonblack rosette tulleand black floral lace.

 Post from Fashion Fabrics Club – http://blog.fashionfabricsclub.com/top-five-summer-dresses-2014/#sthash.4xSOJ792.kLtEK02C.dpuf

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Another One Bites the Dust – Alexander Wang

It seems another great designer has sold out to fast fashion; it has been announced that Alexander Wang will be doing a collaboration with Swedish company H&M.

AW

Alexander Wang has become a popular face among the fashion industry elite and as such he should be using his popularity to take a stand for positivity in the fashion industry, like Diane Von Fustrenburg and Andrew Rosen. Who better than famous designers to bring important fashion issues into the spotlight and really challenge the business negligence that goes on behind the scenes of so many large fashion corporations like H&M. Fashion designers have a lot of power in the fashion industry and as we learned from Spiderman, “With great power comes great responsibility.” Alexander Wang took a giant step backward when he teamed up with H&M.

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Textile Traditions – The Hmong Tribe and Kantha Quilts

Native, traditional, Eastern, or often times called, “fixed” dress, that of the indigenous peoples of East-Asian territories, may seem to be the antithesis of the current Western standard of the sartorial etiquette which relies on constant fashion change and the unwavering push for newness. However, these precious, contextually and sentimentally loaded, incredibly detailed traditional textiles are finding their way into the hands of Western designers and customers. Either sold as the authentic pieces of culture they are, straight from the indigenous hands who made them, or upcycled/recycled into fashionable accessories, traditional textiles from the Akha Hill tribes of East Asia are popping up in the homes and closets of savvy, socially conscious consumers around the world, particularly in the UK and US.

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Photo from Laos and Ethnic Minority Cultures: Promoting Heritage

For some of these tribes, like the Hmong who live in the hills of Laos, Thailand and China, the dissemination of these handmade textiles (which they have every part in making from growing the hemp for making the fiber to sewing the end product into garments) is one of the few tangible ways of preserving and sharing their cultural heritage. As Western influence and inexpensive materials make their way to the remote areas of this purely oral-tradition tribe (meaning they have no written language), the skillful art of the traditional Hmong embroidery technique becomes threatened.

For others, such as the Bengali women of India, opportunities to create handmade kantha quilts in their home to sell abroad provides them with financial freedoms otherwise denied women residing in such areas. With a salary they can afford to put their children through school, combatting the sex-trafficking epidemic that is so prevalent in this area, affording independence and stability for at-risk women.

kantha quilts

Kantha Quilts

No matter how they reached the Western markets, the story behind these intricate pieces of textile art, and that of those who made and wore them, need to be preserved. H. Leedom Lefferts Jr., a Lao cultural expert, says in his article promoting the importance of the conservation of Lao material culture, that “Textiles weave indigenous cultures together; they thus provide strands of meaning and action which can be picked up by observers to understand cultures and assist them in coping with the pressures of modern life.” Designers are taking note of the customer craving authenticity and history in their adornments, and what better way to satisfy that need than highly intricate, handmade traditional and ceremonial textiles from age-old tribe techniques.

Sometimes classified as “vintage” fabric, these recycled textiles can be found in mainstream stores such as in the furniture upholstery of Anthropologie, West Elm, and Sundance Catalog. They are also often upcycled into fashionable accessories such as bags, shoes, and garments as in the case of Elliot Mann and Sophia Costas, and the Etsy sites Dazzling Lana and Fairlyworn, to name a few.

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Menswear Monday – Tuxedo Talk

Buying a tuxedo is a major investment. There is a process involved in finding the perfect tux, getting it tailored appropriately and then matching the right accessories for the perfectly polished look. When it comes down to it, the fact of the matter is that the tuxedo is just a suit on steroids. And just like suit wearing, there are a few simple rules that, if followed, will guarantee a successful execution of a dapper tuxedo ensemble:

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10 Commandments of the Tuxedo

I. Honor Thy Body Type

The slim fitted tuxedo has gained a lot of traction recently, but it isn’t a look that can be pulled off by everyone. Be true to your body type and dress accordingly. For slim, and slender frames, opt for the one- or two-button coat preferably with a narrow peak lapel. For heavier-set physiques, experts suggest a box style one-button tux with wide lapels and a deep V-cut down the center of the body. This creates a vertical focal point and elongates the appearance of the torso, creating a slimming effect.

For Tom Kalenderian, executive vice president of Barneys, New York, shoulder fit is an essential part of the proper tux fit. He recommends a snug and high armhole. Even though this may feel a bit restricting, the sacrifice in arm movement will pay off in appearance.

2. Thou Shall Wear a Bow tie

Bow ties with tuxedos are an absolute must, this a universal agreement amongst luxury designers across the board. As the legendary designer, creative mind, and menswear enthusiast Tom Ford proclaims, the everyday four-in-hand necktie is plain inappropriate for a tuxedo, in his words, it is, “just wrong.”

Invest in a high quality bow tie, preferable a self-tie. Something just doesn’t feel right topping off a formal tuxedo ensemble with a clip on. Tying a bow tie knot isn’t as hard as it seems, it just takes a little practice. With the plethora of YouTube tutorials available, there is no excuse!

 3. Thou Shall Stay Proportional

The type and size of bow tie worn with the tuxedo should be based on the kind of shirt collar and lapels it will be paired with. It isn’t rocket science; wide lapels call for wider collars such as the spread collar, and should be matched with larger bow ties, usually the typical butterfly style. For narrow lapels, pair with a slim collar such as the cut diamond collar and opt for the narrower bow ties in the diamond point or bat wing style.

TF JT

Tom Ford and Justine Timberlake in Butterfly Bow Ties

4. Remember Thy Grooming Habits

If donning a tuxedo, odds are, the event you are attending is kind of a big deal, don’t offend by showing up scruffy and unkempt. Clean-shaven is the best look for tuxedo wearers, but if facial hair is your signature, then make sure every hair is in place.

5. Love thy Tailor

“Your tailor is your best friend,” says Michael Hainey, deputy editor of GQ magazine, “What’s weird is that guys spend all this time within the culture of the gym, getting toned, fit bodies, and then they wear suit coats that are two sizes too big.” Never underestimate the power of the perfect fit, as menswear guru Alan Flusser says, “The custom made tuxedo represents the highest expression of tailoring art and sartorial know-how.”

6. Thou Shall Not Disregard the Details

Don’t be afraid to show a little cuff, as it is customary to do so, “the half-inch rule for the cuff reveal has always been inflexible,” Michael Hainey decrees. Tuxedo trousers should have a length that maintains a modest break at the top of the shoe, and should have no cuffs. For footwear, Tom Ford proclaims pumps as preferential. In a standard two-button suit, “the closure defines an anatomical equator,” says Alan Flusser, noting that the closure should be lined up with the bellybutton.

7. Know Thy Suit Coat Options

Notched-lapel blazers are usually reserved for the business/corporate realm, so go for the peaked lapel tuxedo coat. Another, less conventional, option that has become popular in the celebrity scene lately is the shawl collar. The rounded, narrow lapels are reminiscent of the smoking jacket and exude the elegance of old Hollywood glamour.

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Shawl Collar

8. Thou Shall Not Be Afraid of Navy

Even though the term is “Black Tie,” that doesn’t mean you can’t venture out of the black and white category. A dark navy tuxedo is a stylish yet sensible take on the look, giving the tux a modern edge. Navy looks especially great in a slim fitted tux. If venturing into the navy realm, be sure to keep all other aspects of the ensemble simple and classic.

 9. Thou Shall Always Be Elegant

“It’s about elegance,” says prominent menswear designer John Varvatos about wearing tuxedo, proclaiming that there is nothing elegant about yards of cotton bunched up under your coat. He suggests wearing a tapered shirt – you will be more comfortable, and with clean, straight lines will look thinner and much more put together.

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And finally,

10. Thou Shall Not Rent

As Michael Hainey says, renting a tuxedo is, “the equivalent of wearing a bowling shoe.” If within your means, buy, don’t rent.

Various designer quotes from:

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Everyone’s a Fashion Writer

Fashion and style blogs are a dime a dozen and everyone’s a critic. When “fashion writers” try to describe, contextualize, and critique collections, sometimes their sartorial lexicon falls short and clothing jargon gets, literaly, lost in translation.

Here are just a few terms whose meanings have become muddled as of late, often taking on a more macro-meaning than originally intended.

Appliqué: An additive process of attaching design components in layers onto the surface of an object, such as quilts or garments.

Brocade: Commonly used to describe many types of patterned fabrics, however, the term actually denotes a specific type of textile weave. A brocade is a fabric in which woven design is created with supplementary pattern wefts that are discontinuous (the pattern wefts do not pass across the whole width of the woven cloth).

Brocade

Brocade

Chambray:  A smooth, light fabric of cotton, linen, etc, of a plain weave with a colored warp (usually blue) and white weft, appearing like denim. Usually used in warm weather attire because of it’s light weight.

Gaberdine: A woven, warp-faced steep or regular twill fabric with a prominent diagonal rib on the face and smooth surface on the back. Garbardine always has many more warp than weft yarns. Usually made of wool and used to make suits, overcoats, trousers, uniforms, windbreakers, and other garments.

Gabardine

Gauze: Popularly known as any sheer, lightweight fabric, however true gauze is a weave structure in which individual warp yarns across over adjacent warp yarns and then cross back into their original positions, held in place by weft yarns. The areas of crossed warps result in small, visible openings in the cloth, and these openings form the design areas.

Ikat: A resist-dyeing technique in which yarns are tie-dyed before they are woven into cloth. The term derives from Indonesian mengikat, meaning, “to tie”.

Ikat

Ikat

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Learning from the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire

“The Triangle Shirtwaist incident is remembered for its shocking brutality: On March 25, 1911, a ferocious fire broke out at a factory on the ninth floor of a building in New York City’s Greenwich Village. Some of the exits and stairwells had been locked to prevent workers from taking breaks or stealing, leaving many unable to get out. As a result, 146 workers, mostly young immigrant women, died within 20 minutes. They were burned alive, asphyxiated by smoke or died trying to escape out of the windows and balcony.” -Huffington Post

triangle shirtwaist factory

The anniversary of this tradegy reminds us how important it is to protect the fair labor of factory workers. Even though we are not even close to where we should be when it comes to fair labor practices (especially 103 years post Triangle Shirtwaist Fire incident), there are a few commendable organizations who fight to promote fair labor in the fashion industry:

The Worker Rights Consortium (WRC) is an independent labor rights monitoring organization, conducting investigations of working conditions in factories around the globe. Our purpose is to combat sweatshops and protect the rights of workers who make apparel and other products.

The WRC conducts independent, in-depth investigations; issues public reports on factories producing for major brands; and aids workers at these factories in their efforts to end labor abuses and defend their workplace rights. The WRC is proud to have the support of over 175 college and university affiliates and our primary focus is the labor practices of factories that make university-related apparel.

With the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)* to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.

OSHA is part of the United States Department of Labor. The administrator for OSHA is the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health. OSHA’s administrator answers to the Secretary of Labor, who is a member of the cabinet of the President of the United States.

Labour Behind the Label supports garment workers’ efforts worldwide to improve their working conditions, through awareness raising, information provision and encouraging international solidarity between workers and consumers.

Members include trade unions and their local branches, consumer organisations, campaign groups, and charities.

These organisations work together, through Labour Behind the Label, to achieve four aims:

1. Raise public awareness and mobilise consumers.
2. Pressure companies to take responsibility for workers’ rights in the entirety of their supply chains.
3. Support workers in their struggles for decent working conditions, including speaker tours and urgent appeals.
4. Lobby governments and policy makers to bring about change.

Eco Fashion World’s GUIDE is your essential resource to sustainable designer brands and online eco fashion stores. Click on any search button above to help you find what you’re looking for. Being a green shopper and a sustainable fashionista has never been so easy.

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The Sewer and the Machine

“The methodical and precise sound of a sewing machine is oddly calming.

It is one of those steps that looks as if it can be done in an auto-pilot state of mind. But it is actually a job requiring incredibly skill and a deep knowledge of the machine and its relationship to the person. In order to perfectly sew a bag, one must know the machine’s personality – its strengths, weaknesses, and quirks.

Perhaps it is this level of intimacy – a result of such precision and perfection along with the constant uniformity of the sound – that makes it so calming.” – Lotuff Leather #MadeInUSA

Original post on Lotuff Leather Website

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Remembering L’Wren

L’Wren Scott, acclaimed costume designer and celebrity stylist has taken her own life, her body was found by her assistant the morning of March 17th. It has emerged that the A-list socialite was massively in debt, “Accounts for her business LS Fashion LTD show it had a deficit of $5,899,548 (4,237,164 Euros) and the designer owed creditors $7.641 million (euros 5,488,125)” (The Mirror).

 L'Wren3

The discourse surrounding L’Wren’s death has revolved around her connections with the celebrity elite (I.e. being Mick Jagger’s long-time girlfriend and being best friends with Nicole Kidman, Ellen Barkin, Daphne Guinness, and Rachel Feinstein), but Ms. Scott had many accomplishments besides being an A-list socialist.

DaphneGuinness

L’Wren began her career in the fashion world as a model in the 1980s for Thierry Mugler. At a height of 6 feet 3 inches, Scott became known as the model with “The Longest Legs in Britain.”

L'Wren4

Her modeling career was short-lived, as she moved to the business-side of the fashion industry with a knack for styling and an address book full of celebrity high society members like Madonna, Julia Roberts, and Angelina Jolie. In 2000, L’Wren was actually named the “official” stylist of the Oscars.

L'Wren and Karl

Expanding into costume design was the next logical step for the highly connected fashionista. Her costume design repertoire includes Ocean’s Thirteen, Eyes Wide Shut and Martin Scorsese’s documentary about The Rolling Stones. In 2006, L’Wren launched her own collection and became a favorite among the London Fashion Week scene, always showing at the end of the week in an intimate setting with a small but ultra-posh audience and the finest of catering (that always matched the collection).

L'Wren Scott

 

It is sad to see such a talent succumb to the pressures that go along with being a high-profile fashion designer (which brings to mind the late Alexander McQueen, R.I.P.). Just goes to show that the glitz and glamour of the fashion scene is sometimes just smoke and mirrors and when the illusion dissipates, the harsh realities of maintaining a successful fashion business is sometimes too much for creative minds to cope with.

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