Tag Archives: Fashion

Designer Spotlight – Hardy Amies

Taken from The British Fashion Council, and inspired by last weekend’s London Collections: Men where Hardy Amies’ Creative Director Mehmet Ali showed the luxury brand’s A/W 2015 collection.

HARDY AMIES – Historical Brand Biography Menswear Heritage

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Edwin Hardy Amies examining fashion designs for the following season: 1952

When Sir Hardy Amies launched ‘Man’, his debut menswear catwalk show 51 years ago at The Savoy hotel onlookers were agog with Society doyenne Lady Diana Cooper declaring, “Daahling… but it will never take off”. The subsequent headlines proved her quite wrong with glowing reviews for a unique event from the man who dressed HM The Queen.

Over half a Century later, the House of Hardy Amies is now under the distinct eye of Creative Director Claire Malcolm.

Dapper, dashing and aquiline, Sir Hardy Amies and his diktats were all too often terrifying. A lover of men and menswear he detested cufflinks, liked leathers and thought it naff to wear black tie in the evening – always insisting on midnight blue. He turned his nose up at turn- ups, was bemused by the 1960s beatnik look and on the subject of men’s underwear demanded it be ‘kept brief’.

As the first designer to put menswear on the catwalk in 1961, Hardy Amies decided the event had to be ‘special’, moreover memorable. The show proved to be a first on many levels. It was the first of its kind to have recorded music playing and the first time a designer accompanied his models on stage.

The designer Kenneth Partridge (who was the mastermind behind every society ball and pop-star home of the time), Brian Epstein and John Lennon, produced the show. Partridge recalled Hardy’s excitement. “Hardy was like a child in a candy shop. He was determined the show would be a success and intent on making as big an impact as possible joined the models on the catwalk at the close of the show. Something that had never been seen before”. He continued, “He picked the music and then keeping it a secret even from me, arranged for the creation of a gargantuan paper maché gloved hand adorned with bracelets and rings to wave regally behind the models at the close of the show. Hardy Amies told reporters afterwards that the hand was the Queen giving menswear her seal of approval”. The Queen was said to have been amused when hearing of the spectacle.

Hardy Amies on the steps of No. 14 Savile Row: 1950

Hardy Amies on the steps of No. 14 Savile Row: 1950

A former Hardy Amies PR man described Sir Hardy Amies as, “Imperious, arrogant and pompous, but saved by great wit and a wonderful sense of humour”. Sir Hardy Amies would quite agree adding ‘snob’ to the list.

Hardy used to say in his youth that his social climbing had been so energetic he would take his alpenstock to parties. Best known as London’s most successful couturier he dressed HM The Queen (from her accession to the throne until his retirement in 1989) who along with her sister HRH Princess Margaret delighted in his mimicry; full of antechamber gossip he ached to tell, but like contemporary and fellow court dressmaker Sir Norman Hartnell, held his tongue for propriety sake. As a former member of the SOE, he knew what was strictly

forbidden. “Kim Philby was always trying to get information out of me.” he complained to a friend and when asked what sort of information Hardy retorted, “well, the name of my tailor of course!”

Outside the constraints of Buckingham Palace, Amies found other avenues to channel his wit, frivolity and sarcasm, the latter usually on the barman at his London club, if he dared to forget to have martini with a twist of orange peel (his own recipe) waiting on his table on arrival.

Hardy Amies fitting a model in the Grand Salon: 1955

Hardy Amies fitting a model in the Grand Salon: 1955

The only man in the British army to have his uniform tailored on Savile Row, Amies never forgot his fashion background (beginning as Design Director at the House of Lachasse in 1934) even when in the midst of armed warfare on the front line. He actually engaged famed war photographer Lee Miller to produce a series of poised pictures for Vogue before he left to serve in Belgium.

Amies dressed HM The Queen and the wider House of Windsor and before the Windsor’s, Hollywood Royalty, becoming great friends with Edward G. Robinson, Douglas Fairbanks Jnr., and great beauties Ava Gardner and Hedy Lamarr.

By the 1960s his involvement in film and film stars transcending to costume designer on Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, Two for the Road with Albert Finney and Audrey Hepburn and re-inventing the bowler hat worn with great modern splendour by Patrick McNee on The Avengers. David Hockney favoured wide pin-stripe coats whereas Peter Sellers liked skinny fitting suits.

Despite the attraction of high profile names, not every star was welcomed by Sir Hardy Amies with open arms. Society legend Zsa Zsa Gabor recalled seeing Hardy give Frank Sinatra a dressing down in LA in the eighties. “Hardy looked Sinatra up and down and told him that for a man of his stature, to wear a double-breasted suit was wrong! Wrong! Wrong!” Another witnessed Hardy insisting a prospective client take up a gym membership before expecting to wear a Hardy Amies suit with flair!

Sir Hardy’s lore on the subject of dress was always direct and droll famously demanding that, “A woman’s day clothes must look equally good at Salisbury Station as the Ritz bar” and for men that, “A man should look as if he had bought his clothes with intelligence, put them on with care, and then forgotten all about them”.

The House of Hardy Amies Today

The House of Hardy Amies Today

Austin Mutti-Mewse

Curator, Hardy Amies

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The Lackluster Golden Globes Red Carpet & What They Should Have Worn

Save for Kate Hudson in Versace and J.Lo in Zahair Murad, the ensembles parading down the Golden Globe’s red carpet tonight turned out to be one giant disappointment (Emma Stone wore a jumpsuit and Lorde wore trousers…and media sources are commending them…really!?). Celebrities should look down right jaw-dropping for these kinds of high profile events, especially for the Golden Globes which is considered one of the biggest red carpet fashion events of the year. We don’t know whether to blame the celebs or their stylists, but we sure know it’s not because of a lack of innovative design, the couture collections for this year are absolutely stunning. Here’s are some looks we wish we saw adorning out favorite stars at this year’s awards:

Stephane Rolland 

SRred2 SRred1

SRmaroon1SRmaroon2

SRBWSRBW2

SRblack1SRblack2

Zahair Murad

ZM1

Ralph & Russo

R&R2 R&R1 R&R3

Azzaro

Azzaro1

Versace

Versace

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Designer Spotlight – Daniela D’Amico

DanielaDAmico_DigitalLookbookAW14 copy

One of I.F.’s prime objectives is to spread the word about amazing, innovative, and creatively unique designers from around the world, and share their individual stories with the fashion community as they start to gain ground in the  industry.

The designers featured by I.F. have passed a series of requirements including (but not limited to) the use of fair labor practices and a knack for unique and awe-inspiring design that we believe set them apart from their peers and that will undoubtedly give them the ability to lay claim to a successful career in fashion design as they begin their journey in building their brand.

This week, I.F. is featuring Daniela D’Amico, a London-based designer whose Autumn/Winter 2014 collection is inspired by the picturesque scenery and architecture of her ancestral home, Lake Como, Italy. I.F. sat down with the up-and-coming designer who divulged all about her career journey and the story behind her brand. She also kindly gave us some exclusive photos of her Autumn/Winter 2014 Collection to share with the I.F. audience!

Daniela’s fashion journey started at a young age. Daniela was always interested in textiles and fashion in school and often spent her free time trying to create new textiles and using her home sewing machine to sew lustrous fabrics like silks and satins, “I loved to make interesting finishes using a princess pleater, this was my favourite tool for coming up with innovative creations,” says the young designer. Daniela went on to study Art Foundation at The London College of Fashion and from there went on to Chelsea College of Art where she received her BA in Textile Design. It was here that the designer discovered specialized design techniques including how to convey traditional techniques in a modern way, as well as how to use digital print and fabric manipulation – a complex technique which has become the designer’s trademark. When she graduated, Daniela went on to work in womenswear as Head of the Design Studio for Selina Blow. This year, Daniela decided it was time to pursue her dream of starting her own brand.

Daniela finds inspiration in her surroundings, “If I am in London it may be a part of architecture, an art show, color, or nature. It could be a different city that I may be in. Wherever I go, I will always carry my note book and jot down anything that I feel inspires me, or inspirational thoughts I have. I am usually inspired by a certain place, artist or movement – it can be a combination of them all. For this season I was also inspired by the work of Peter Doig who captured timeless moments of perfect tranquillity.”

peter doig

Peter Doig’s “Concrete Cabin” 1994, oil on canvas

Daniela’s strong dedication to her craft is more than admirable – it is inspiring. She works tirelessly from sketch to production in order to construct absolutely original, top-of-the-line designs, “All of the images are taken myself. I have manipulated the images and almost played with them like they are a piece of collage, working with each image on top of a sketch of one of my garment designs. I then work out which part of the print would work where and go from there.”

When it comes to materials and production, Daniela uses only the best, “I use a selection of cottons, satins, silks and velvets. All of my fabrics are either sourced from England or Italy. I like to mix textiles, you will see a mixture of soft satins on one piece with a fierce structured collar made in cotton velvet to finish. I use a small factory in London, it has a very nice, friendly and relaxed atmosphere and they are great to work with considering I am always challenging them with my printed textiles and luxurious, expensive fabrics!”

Isola Bella

The Lake Como-inspired A/W ’14 collection is the result of the designers textile design expertise combined with her eye for photography and knack for originality. The collection has an androgynous gestalt, achieved by a harmonious combination of intricate tailoring and romantic prints. Each and every piece is given special attention to proportion and design positioning ensuring an ultra-flattering silhouette.

Cernobbio

Emma Watson, Alexa Chung and Sienna Miller were some of the names the designer mentioned when asked about her dream customer, “a modern, laid back, strong woman who enjoys colour and bringing tailoring to life.”

Daniela has marked plans for the future, planning “to one day take the brand internationally, and show the collection to as many people as I possibly can. One of the most interesting parts in the job is meeting the people who want to wear my clothes and hearing their story, this inspires me to design.”

Though still in the stages of putting her on-line store, www.danieladamico.com,  together, be sure to check out her Facebook for updates on her collection and an inside look to her creative process.

Thank you, Daniela, for sharing your passion with us – we are looking forward to getting our hands on a few pieces from your collection!

Como

 

Tremezzo

 

Montagna

 

DA

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Top Five Summer Dresses 2014

An eclectic mix of elements will be seen meshing together in the outfits of the fashion conscious this summer. Lace overlays, sheer cutouts, pale pastels, a mini ‘90s revival, athletic aesthetics, floral patterns and iridescent fabrics were among the most trending features reported by the top fashion intelligence experts. Five clear dress styles are sure to become summer wardrobe staples, encompassing trending elements in a wide variety of breathable fabrics from romantic flowing silks to sporty jersey knits:

shirtdress1. The Menswear Inspired Shirtdress

The comfortable and versatile shirtdress is by far the number one top trending dress style for summer 2014. In lengths ranging from maxi to mini, the traditional shirtdress will be seen in pastel shirting fabrics like Raspberry Pink Chambray  and all-white cottons like White BroadclothMore formal versions will be made of elegant, slinky fabrics like Chambray Blue Slinky and Dusty Blue Crepe Sweater Knit Floral and geometric prints like the Blue Block Polyester Charmeuse will also be major themes in this particular dress style.

2. The Sexy Pencil SkirtPencilSkirt

Pencil skirts that land just above to knee to calf-length are a big summer must-have. The body-hugging silhouette will be seen with lace overlays from bright red stretch laceto pastels like Pink Peach Stretch LaceDark Blush Pink Laceand Cream Stretch Lace Pencil skirts will also be made of light-weight jersey knits made of polyester/spandex or cotton/spandex blends for an exaggerated form-fitting look with this summer’s trending prints like animal print motifsgrey/black snakeskin jersey knitGrey Snakeskin Jersey KnitGrey Cheetah Jersey KnitGrey/Purple Cheetah Jersey Knitand tribal prints White/Orange Aztec Jersey Knit and Beige Aztec Stripe Jersey KnitPencil skirts with black stretch mesh cutouts are also popular, adding an extra hint of sex appeal to the already sexy silhouette.

SlinkySlipDress

3. The Slinky Slip Dress

A staple of the ‘90s wardrobe, the slip dress is making a revival this summer in iridescent silks and metallic sheens like Violet Purple Shimmer and Pale Yellow Iridescent Silk Organza The slip dress, in various flowing fabrics of silk, blends and slinky synthetics like rayon, will also feature some of summer’s trending elements like floral prints – Black/White Floral ChallisBlack Floral ChallisIvory Floral Silk Chiffonpastels – Blush Pink CrepePeach Silk Crepe de ChineBaby Blue Crinkled Silk ChiffonPink/Blue Silk Crepe de ChineSalmon Pink Satin Charmeuse, and bright pinks – Lipstick Pink Crepe

4. The Sporty Jersey Dress

SportyJerseyDress

A casual, athletic aesthetic is a major summer trend, and in terms of dresses this translates into sleeveless sheath styles in lightweight cotton/lycra jersey knits like Black Jersey Knit especially with thigh-high side slits.

The “athletic luxe” trend also brought the return of the super comfortable sweatshirt dress in thicker, yet soft and breathable, 100% cotton jersey knits like the Charcoal Grey Jersey Knit The sweatshirt dress will be seen in mini skirt lengths with short, three-quarter length, or long sleeves.

FullSkirt

5. The Flirty Full Skirt

In lengths ranging from maxi to mini, full skirts will be seen flouncing around the legs of style mavens this summer in a wide range of shapes. The summer 2014 version of full skirts will be made in structured, A-line shapes with Black Tulle underlays, and also flowing styles with sheer overlays like accordion pleated Black Chiffonblack rosette tulleand black floral lace.

 Post from Fashion Fabrics Club – http://blog.fashionfabricsclub.com/top-five-summer-dresses-2014/#sthash.4xSOJ792.kLtEK02C.dpuf

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Everyone’s a Fashion Writer

Fashion and style blogs are a dime a dozen and everyone’s a critic. When “fashion writers” try to describe, contextualize, and critique collections, sometimes their sartorial lexicon falls short and clothing jargon gets, literaly, lost in translation.

Here are just a few terms whose meanings have become muddled as of late, often taking on a more macro-meaning than originally intended.

Appliqué: An additive process of attaching design components in layers onto the surface of an object, such as quilts or garments.

Brocade: Commonly used to describe many types of patterned fabrics, however, the term actually denotes a specific type of textile weave. A brocade is a fabric in which woven design is created with supplementary pattern wefts that are discontinuous (the pattern wefts do not pass across the whole width of the woven cloth).

Brocade

Brocade

Chambray:  A smooth, light fabric of cotton, linen, etc, of a plain weave with a colored warp (usually blue) and white weft, appearing like denim. Usually used in warm weather attire because of it’s light weight.

Gaberdine: A woven, warp-faced steep or regular twill fabric with a prominent diagonal rib on the face and smooth surface on the back. Garbardine always has many more warp than weft yarns. Usually made of wool and used to make suits, overcoats, trousers, uniforms, windbreakers, and other garments.

Gabardine

Gauze: Popularly known as any sheer, lightweight fabric, however true gauze is a weave structure in which individual warp yarns across over adjacent warp yarns and then cross back into their original positions, held in place by weft yarns. The areas of crossed warps result in small, visible openings in the cloth, and these openings form the design areas.

Ikat: A resist-dyeing technique in which yarns are tie-dyed before they are woven into cloth. The term derives from Indonesian mengikat, meaning, “to tie”.

Ikat

Ikat

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Remembering L’Wren

L’Wren Scott, acclaimed costume designer and celebrity stylist has taken her own life, her body was found by her assistant the morning of March 17th. It has emerged that the A-list socialite was massively in debt, “Accounts for her business LS Fashion LTD show it had a deficit of $5,899,548 (4,237,164 Euros) and the designer owed creditors $7.641 million (euros 5,488,125)” (The Mirror).

 L'Wren3

The discourse surrounding L’Wren’s death has revolved around her connections with the celebrity elite (I.e. being Mick Jagger’s long-time girlfriend and being best friends with Nicole Kidman, Ellen Barkin, Daphne Guinness, and Rachel Feinstein), but Ms. Scott had many accomplishments besides being an A-list socialist.

DaphneGuinness

L’Wren began her career in the fashion world as a model in the 1980s for Thierry Mugler. At a height of 6 feet 3 inches, Scott became known as the model with “The Longest Legs in Britain.”

L'Wren4

Her modeling career was short-lived, as she moved to the business-side of the fashion industry with a knack for styling and an address book full of celebrity high society members like Madonna, Julia Roberts, and Angelina Jolie. In 2000, L’Wren was actually named the “official” stylist of the Oscars.

L'Wren and Karl

Expanding into costume design was the next logical step for the highly connected fashionista. Her costume design repertoire includes Ocean’s Thirteen, Eyes Wide Shut and Martin Scorsese’s documentary about The Rolling Stones. In 2006, L’Wren launched her own collection and became a favorite among the London Fashion Week scene, always showing at the end of the week in an intimate setting with a small but ultra-posh audience and the finest of catering (that always matched the collection).

L'Wren Scott

 

It is sad to see such a talent succumb to the pressures that go along with being a high-profile fashion designer (which brings to mind the late Alexander McQueen, R.I.P.). Just goes to show that the glitz and glamour of the fashion scene is sometimes just smoke and mirrors and when the illusion dissipates, the harsh realities of maintaining a successful fashion business is sometimes too much for creative minds to cope with.

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Who Wears the Pants?

Dockers          Dockers

In order to understand the world and the endless amount of information we take in every second, the human brain has developed the use of ‘schemata’ or categories which are used as frameworks so that information can be easily and quickly filed away to help us interact appropriately in different situations. Everyone has their own set of schemata influenced by background, upbringing, experiences and relationships. Yet, there is no doubt that everyone uses them. They have to, as some scholars say, or else there would be information overloads and no interaction would be able to take place. Some schemata are shared by the general populous, such as gender schemata. The female schema contains characteristics such as nurturing, facilitating, polite, dependent, and unaggressive. The male schema says men are dominant, aggressive, stoic, successful, independent, and the breadwinners. There are also other schemata that go along with race/ethnicity, class, religion, occupation, national identity, and sexuality.

These universally accepted schemata can be easily discovered by simply looking at the media and advertisement portrayals in how the represent their markets. It seems that Dockers has very different schemata traits when it comes to gay and straight men which we can see in their most recent advertising campaign. This campaign began a in early December of 2009 which called for men to go back to their roots, to act more manly, and to ‘Wear the Pants’.

Most of the ad’s have the same general format; a man standing in front of a plain background, the top half of him is a saying and he is wearing Dockers pants. What is interesting is the difference in the word choice given the context the ad will be seen. Can you guess which one of the above ads I found in Out magazine, the national gay fashion and lifestyle magazine for the US? Without getting into the phrases used, you could probably tell just by the style and fit of the pants. The ones on the left are an orange/pink and the fit is much tighter than the khaki’s on the right which are looser, wrinklier, and a dull tan. Even the stance of the two are remarkably different. We have one who is almost posing sexually, looking to the side, or behind him as if looking for someone to make a connection with, versus the other man who seems to have no interest in what is going on around him, rather he is looking out with his hands on his hips as if he just accomplished a trying task or is contemplating the meaning of life. Getting down to the more obvious of differences, we see what the Dockers advertising campaign sees as the difference in priorities between gay men and straight men through the phrases they chose to make up the body (in both sense of the word) of their ad. ‘Behold the Second Dawn of Man’ goes along with the main theme of the Dockers new ad campaign which, in summary, claims that our society has become genderless, and is therefore crumbling.  It calls for men to drop their non-fat lattes, put on their pants, be men and help little old ladies cross the street, discipline misbehaving children, and of course, buy Docker’s pants. It is easy to see the sexism in this campaign, but further drudging of the advertisements brings to light more prejudice ideals. First of all, the ad I found in Out is much harder to track down in other outlets. In fact, it doesn’t even appear in a Google search. Does Dockers not want to be identified with the gay community,? if so, why advertise in a gay magazine?

The phrase used for the advertisement placed in a gay context states, ‘Attract the touches of friends, boyfriends, and even the occasional stranger’. So, straight men wear their pants to maintain order in society, gay men wear pants to be promiscuous and attract attention from occasional strangers. Though it seems trite to take such a critical view of these two seemingly unimportant advertising images, it does bring light to how mainstream corporations view different subcultures and instill representations and reinforce stereotypes. As the introduction to Erving Goffman’s book Gender Advertisements says, “Advertisements depict for us not necessarily how we actually behave as men and women but how we think men and women behave. This depiction serves the social purpose of convincing us that this is how men and women are, or want to be, or should be not only in relation to themselves but in relation to each other” (Gornick, 1979).

It is important to understand the implications and affects these representations have on our culture. From creating unfair homogenous stereotypes of a group to instilling an unattainable body and lifestyle ideal people try to live up to.

*Re-post from last year in honor of #ThrowBackThursday

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The Better Cotton Initiative

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The Better Cotton Initiative (BCI) aims to make global production of cotton more sustainable not only for the environment, but for the future and for the people who produce it, from farmers to textile mills to retailers. Working with a “diverse range” of members along the entire cotton supply chain, BCI collaborates with and provides solutions for better cotton production practices, promoting improvements for the environment, farming communities and the economies of cotton-producing areas.

“Cotton is one of the world’s most important natural fibres. It’s used by nearly everyone on Earth every day, and supports 300 million people’s livelihoods. It’s a renewable natural resource, but only if we manage it responsibly. In 2005, a group of visionary organisations came together to figure out what could be done to safeguard the future of cotton. ‘There has to be a better way’, they said. It turns out there is. It’s called Better Cotton.” (www.bettercotton.org)

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Fashion companies associated with this initiative include Adidas, Gap Inc., H&M, Inditex (Zara), Levi Strauss & Co., Nike, Tommy Hilfiger, and VF Corp. (Parent company of 7 for all mankind, Nautica, Jansport, The North Face, Wrangler, Timberland, Vans). The Better Cotton website explains why so many big names have become members of BCI,

“One of the reasons that leading retailers and brands support the Better Cotton Initiative is that they realise that if famers do not earn enough money growing cotton, they will switch to some other crop, and this could eventually lead to increased costs for the brands or other supply scarcity issues. It is very much in the brands’ own best interest that farmers benefit from any margin improvement their efforts result in.”  (www.bettercotton.org)

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What is particularly commending about this not-for-profit organization is it’s inclusive attitude towards varying farming methods. It does not push an organic-agenda on farmers, rather, BCI collaborates with farmers to create a more sustainable system for whatever production methodology is being used.

Working together for positive change – I.F. commends the brands who are members of this admirable initiative (momentarily setting aside some of these companies not-so-commendable business practices in other areas).

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*All photos from the Better Cotton website: http://www.bettercotton.org

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Flint and Tinder – Menswear Made-In-USA Brand

Introducing Flint and Tinder, a casual, high-quality menswear brand with a mission,

“A battle cry: Not everything should be disposable. Companies have systematically lowered your expectations to the point where it’s hard to know what to expect anymore. But while they’re busy off-shoring, out sourcing and generally making things as cheaply and quickly as possible… it ends here.”

Screen Shot 2014-03-05 at 2.39.12 AM

Comfortable, cool clothing with small but beautiful stylistic detailing, Flint and Tinder provides quality and fashionable looks that are exclusively made in America.

crewneck sweatshirt

 

The 10-year hoodie is a winning product. For $99 this comfortable, unisex zip-up comes in a variety of colors and is backed by a 10 year guarantee, complete with free mending.

hoodies

 

Kudos to Flint and Tinder for being a responsible brand, and being a leader in the slow fashion movement.

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